Misled Youth | END. SS20 Editorial .01

Pairing skate brands Fucking Awesome and Polar Skate Co. with low-key contemporary menswear labels Our Legacy, Aries and Needles, the culture of skateboarding has nurtured a style typified by graphic-laden design and a laissez-faire attitude.

Popularised through the latter portion of the 20th Century, skateboarding has cultivated a unique viewpoint within its own culture and beyond. A highly skilled pursuit that lies somewhere between social activity and daring sport - a contested definition as the discipline is welcomed into the Olympic Games for the first time for Tokyo 2020 - skateboarding demonstrates the power of practice; pushing the bounds of human perseverance and commanding a level of dedication so pronounced that putting yourself in harm's way is part and parcel of the journey to mastery.

By consequence of this fevered dedication, skateboarding has developed a unique sense of style favoured by skaters and fans alike. Defined by bold graphics, loose fits, and a playful combination of streetwear aesthetics and low-key charm, a skate wardrobe offers an instantly recognisable but uncomplicated vision of menswear. Combining forward-thinking aesthetics, a tongue-in-cheek sensibility, and a penchant for occasional crassness, skateboarding has built a visual code rooted in the history of the culture, interpolated with modern-day twists and nods to bygone eras.

Pairing skate brands such as Jason Dill's Fucking Awesome and Polar Skate Co. with low-key contemporary menswear labels Our Legacy, Aries and Needles, the culture of skateboarding has nurtured a style typified by graphic-laden design and a laissez-faire attitude and exemplified by some of the culture's premier figures like Blondey McCoy. A melting pot of influence that stems from classic skate style, modern streetwear aesthetics and the zeitgeist defining visual codes inherent to the world of menswear today, skateboarding offers an eclectic approach that champions the outsider and celebrates those who reject the norm, building communities that offer a true representation of sub-culture in the 21st Century.

Delving into the world of skateboarding, END.'s "Misled Youth" editorial posits a depiction of the culture’s aesthetic that explores the fluidity and unique nature of the way its participants dress. Named after the legendary 1999 Zero Skateboards video of the same name, starring Jamie Thomas, Adrian Lopez and Ryan Bobier, amongst many more, Misled Youth takes a trip through the nuanced style of skateboarding.

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